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Atari Heavy Sixer Ribbon Problem


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#21 CrossBow

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 03:40 PM

Forgot to add a few more things about this.

 

when you do get those traces repaired if any are broken, then the areas where you scraped off the solder mask, you need to use some clear nail polish or super clue to coat over the exposed traces. If you don't you leave the copper open to corrosion and that will lead to more issues down the line. I actually just use a thin coat of solder ontop of exposed traces as long as there isn't a risk of anything shorting across it. 

 

Anytime you are de-soldering something and you remove the solder and it doesn't come free easily, you need to add more solder and try and remove it again. For really stubborn old joints I usually add a bit of solder to the top and bottom of board where the component goes through to make sure it all mixes in well before I try and remove it.

 

De-soldering ICs isn't the easiest thing so these things happen. Just be patient and methodical about it and you will get better over time. For practice, pick up old electronics from computer stores tossing out stuff that aren't recycling it properly, or hit up your local thrift stores for cheap older electronics like old radios and the like that obviously look like they won't work for a couple of bucks. Good way to get the experience you need without feeling bad about butchering it up, and you will likely salvage some parts you might just need in the future.

 

Also this is what I do to fix these old ribbon cables that start to come apart. And you really should replace it or do something about it, because the inner traces could potentially short against each other if you were to bump it while it was on. There is voltage in those traces going to the main logic in the fear cage box that it hides in. Funny thing here is that I actually machine pin headers for this. Also this repair was on an Intellivision I fixed for someone else as they had hosed up the ribbon cable pretty badly in trying to do their own repairs.

 

Intelly_power_Ribbon_Fix.jpg


Edited by CrossBow, 12 February 2018 - 03:48 PM.

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#22 Atarileaf

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 09:02 PM

Thanks for the advice guys. I do have a Hakko soldering station with digital controls. What is the temperature in Celcius I should set it at? And you're right I probably did have the iron on too long on some of those spots. A solder sucker wasn't working so I tried desoldering braid after applying some liquid flux to the board. I was still having trouble for some reason. My station was set to 600C I believe. The tip was tinned and working but I still had a hard time removing some of those solder points. Some came quick, others didn't. You can probably tell the ones I struggled with :)


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#23 CrossBow

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 09:43 PM

600c is too hot for most board work. I usually have my Hakko 936 set between 350 - 400c for most work. On the Colecovision I actually keep it at 280 - 300 thereabouts. The CV uses a lot of leaded solder and is melts easier. Unfortunately, so do the contact pads and traces...

 

I will occasionally put the iron at around 700 - 750 if I have to solder something on a large trace that is likely ground. That is because the larger the surface area you are attaching to, the more heat is needed since the larger area will 'sink' the heat away and prevent the solder from sticking to the pads where it is needed.

 

One way you know you iron is likely too hot, is when the solder sticks to the iron more than it will what the solder should be adhering to.


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#24 dgrubb

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 09:43 PM

 My station was set to 600C I believe.

 

:o

 

I usually keep mine at around 350C, and even that may be a little high for the older solder alloys used in the late-70s.

 

For practice, pick up old electronics

 

This is sound advice, especially with the anxiety this has been causing you recently.


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#25 RickR

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 11:01 PM

Thanks for the 350 tip.  I'll use that too. 

 

I use the copper braid to un-solder stuff.  But it seems like you have to crank up the heat to get that to actually work.  I know...I should probably invest in a nicer way to de-solder stuff. 


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#26 CrossBow

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 01:59 AM

Yeah...once my wife surprised me one Father's Day about 4 years ago now I think?, with my Hakko FR-300 I've not touched the de-soldering braid or my solder sucker since!


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#27 Atarileaf

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 06:57 AM

The desoldering guns are the best way to go but unless you use them a lot I can't justify the expense. RickR is correct that it seems like you need the iron really hot for desoldering braid. I normally prefer solder suckers but these tiny solder points on IC's that are so close together seem impossible to suck up.


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#28 dgrubb

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 01:14 PM

 

I use the copper braid to un-solder stuff.  But it seems like you have to crank up the heat to get that to actually work.  I know...I should probably invest in a nicer way to de-solder stuff. 

 

Dab a small bit of flux onto your braid. You're essentially trying to create the same effect as when you solder to pads, but in the reverse direction.

 

 

The desoldering guns are the best way to go but unless you use them a lot I can't justify the expense. RickR is correct that it seems like you need the iron really hot for desoldering braid. I normally prefer solder suckers but these tiny solder points on IC's that are so close together seem impossible to suck up.

 

I use hot air a lot because, for most tasks, you don't need a terribly good unit and can get away with doing decent work with something cheap. I got one for work where I needed to do some SMD rework for ~$40. At that price I'm just going to use it until destruction and replace with something similar if the need arises again.

 

N.B., I thought those suckers were a great idea until I had to actually do a lot of removal. It's handy for removing large amounts from some awkward spots, but it doesn't seem to really do much better than a bit of braid.


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