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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/26/2020 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    2649! Quarantine time makes for good fishin'
  2. 3 points
    kamakazi20012

    Harry Potter vs Freddy Krueger ?

    Freddy would get his butt whipped...if I know Watson. If she's got the balls to punch Malfoy then Krueger doesn't stand a chance.
  3. 2 points
    Ms. Pac-Man Atari 7800 ProSystem Controller: JOYSTICK / KEYBOARD / PLAYER'S CHOICE Difficulty Level: Cherry (Default) Play on: Real Hardware / Dedicated Console / MAME / Emulation OK! ✔ Squad Challenge ends 11:59 pm PST April 14th, 2020 Objective Play for the highest possible score using the difficulty settings defined in the challenge. Post a photo or YouTube video of your score in this thread. Scores must be achieved between April 1st through April 14th, 2020. Screen captures are not allowed as they are more easily manipulated for falsified scores. Multiple submissions are permitted. The player with the highest score at the end of the competition is the victor! Eligibility Anyone can join in. All players are welcome! Play Rules Games may be played on real hardware, Flashback or emulation, using any controller or keyboard, following all rules and game settings defined in the challenge. Choosing between real hardware or emulation, and choosing which controller to play on is part of formulating your strategy. Enhancements, rewinds and hacked versions of this game are not allowed. Difficulty Level Cherries. (Press Fire to Play) This is the default difficulty setting when you power on the system. Fair Play Your integrity is everything. Players should play fairly, be honest, and have fun! Falsified scores will result in your immediate removal from the site. It goes without saying that we will not allow cheats, hacks, cartridge frying, enhancements, rewinds, deceitful photo manipulation, subterfuge, or any other unfair advantage. Everybody hates a cheater. More To review detailed rules on how to play, please visit the High Score Squad page here: Message Welcome to our 76th Squad Challenge! We're celebrating National Pac-Man Day this month with a few rounds of Ms. Pac-Man on the Atari 7800! Ms. Pac-Man was one of the first titles released on the 7800 and a must-have for any Atari 7800 aficionado. We're still keeping things light and breezy as we deal with this Coronavirus situation and get back into the swing of things in the forums, so kick back, relax, and put on a nice easy game of 7800 Ms. Pac-Man. I hope you guys are ready for a new season of High Score Squad and good luck to everybody participating! NOTE: Upcoming Squad Challenges will be simple and straightforward until the site issues are completely resolved. We'll dive deeper with some fun Squad Challenges this summer. Thanks for playing, and enjoy! Ms_Pac-Man.a78Ms_Pac-Man.pdf
  4. 2 points
    63,370 If all else fails, there's always National K.C. Munchkin Day. There IS one, right?
  5. 2 points
    RickR

    Squad Challenge - Go Fish! (Atari 2600)

    I'd get George Plimpton and Alan Alda in a cage match to settle it once and for all. My money is on Hawkeye.
  6. 2 points
    Justin

    Squad Challenge - Go Fish! (Atari 2600)

    So you're saying that if George Plimpton were to compare the Atari 2600 fish game with Intellivision® Shark! Shark!, he'd think you'd agree that Intellivision® Shark! Shark! plays like the real thing?
  7. 2 points
    RickR

    RE: My Tragic C64 incident

    I think that sad story has been repeated millions of times by other kids in every place on Earth. It's called the "stupid tax". The price we pay for the stupid things we do. Hopefully, we all learn from these mistakes the first time they happen!
  8. 2 points
    RickR

    Squad Challenge - Go Fish! (Atari 2600)

    Not knowing adds to your legendary-ness.
  9. 2 points
    btbfilms76

    7800 Avenue

    Top shelf gaming right here! Nothing better then Ms. Pac-Man on the Atari 7800, that and a beautiful woman playing next to you - Life is good.
  10. 2 points
    RickR

    Squad Challenge - Go Fish! (Atari 2600)

    This game is excellent, but it doesn't quite live up to Shark Shark. Mostly because it starts too slow. The real fun and points start to rack up only when your fish is bigger, and that takes a while. It's really fun though, and thank you for doing this challenge! It's so awesome to try new games.
  11. 2 points
    Justin

    Squad Challenge - Go Fish! (Atari 2600)

    Congratulations RickR! Congratulations @RickR! What a fantastic score! I hope this was a fun challenge, we don't often get to play homebrew games in Squad Challenge, I think that's something we can do move of in the future. Shark! Shark! was always one of my favorite games on Intellivision and it was interesting to see a Shark! Shark! inspired homebrew hit the Atari 2600. A simple but fun concept. Thanks everyone for turning out to play a homebrew Squad Challenge. How do you think Go Fish! compares to other homebrew games on the Atari 2600? Does it live up to the fun of Shark! Shark! on the Intellivision? @RickR posted an impressive score of 2,649 points! The legendary @TrekMD ranked 2nd on the leaderboard with 1,717 points, and @RadioPoultry was right behind him with 1,488 points. @chas10e rounds things out with a solid showing of 831 points. Congrats to RickR for his top ranking and to everyone who jumped in this squad challenge and shared a score! I'd like to encourage RickR to post his new high score on the Scoreboard, and let's make sure this Challenge continues on! NOTE: Our next High Score Squad Challenge will be a special challenge celebrating National Pac-Man Day. Be there!
  12. 2 points
    dauber

    Pie Factory Podcast

    Happy April! It's always a sunshine day when the Pie Factory Podcast brings you a new episode! This time, kick back with a couple of relaxing video games from the '80s, following Jim and Sean through their adventures. (Note: even though we at least twice mentioned the date we recorded this episode, we know that it's easy to forget or not even notice, but...this episode was recorded before the stay-at-home orders were issued! We assure you we practice social distancing. Then again, it's not much of a change of pace for either of us, given our social skills.) https://www.fab4it.com/piefactory/audio/PFP_Episode109.mp3
  13. 2 points
    MaximumRD

    Harry Potter vs Freddy Krueger ?

    Just a fun fan mashup! 😆
  14. 2 points
    Did anyone ever play "Clue: The Great Museum Caper"? That game was indeed great! They ought to re-release that one.
  15. 2 points
    atarifan95

    How Often Do You Play Board Games?

    I've really been into Clue lately. My brother got me this board game for Christmas a few months ago. The only problem is trying to find a time when my family actually wants to play it with me.
  16. 2 points
    WINNER: Justin Xevious Atari 7800 March 30, 2020 ROUND 1: @RadioPoultry ROUND 2: @Justin ROUND 3: @Justin RadioPoultry is a SERIOUS contender and this was a great game to play! He's a gentleman and a great guy to play against. The Atari 7800 really shines with Xevious as @kamakazi20012 was just saying, it feels like legit arcade action with a ton of stuff moving around the screen and zero slowdown. This match was particularly fun because Radio and I both got farther in Xevious than either of us ever had. Radio always posts incredible scores, when I sat down to play this morning I thought I was done for. I barely squeaked by, and RadioPoultry and I had a very close game. Hope to play again!
  17. 2 points
    kamakazi20012

    Game Development Guide

    You're welcome but I won't be teaching programming this time around. What I'm after is those interested in making video games to have the basic knowledge and understanding of what it takes to make a game. I'm also going to be expressing what making a game should be all about. I don't want people coming in full force and making games just to make money. Money should never be the reason behind making games. Those that do that don't and never will care about the video game community and we don't want that. I want people that want to make a game because of their passion for video games and the machines whether it be one or many. If people coming here because they want to make a game but they haven't got a clue on where to begin then I hope this guide will point them in the right direction to having all of their ducks in a row. It is soo much easier to come to the programming stage after spending time putting together everything conceptual on paper from the story to character designs to world appearances that are to be put in the game. There is a reason to my madness for doing it this way that will all come together in the end.
  18. 2 points
    dauber

    Autobiography of a Schnook

    How about a new episode? Stay safe, everybody! In this chapter: ∙ How to Do a Podcast - perhaps something to do during your quarantine? ∙ Yes, And - tales of an improv dropout ∙ Music for Schnooks: "Going" - arguably the most significant lyric in The Beatles' entire discography https://www.schnookpodcast.com/audio/Schnook_Chapter19.mp3
  19. 2 points
    Here's the other one. This one is the sole reason why I wanted a LaserDisc player. Wal-Mart in Branson, Missouri had a Pioneer LD setup and playing a demo disc. This clip from The Mind's Eye was playing when I discovered the setup in the store one visit my Mother and I made. I repeated that clip about 4 times on the machine. Something about was just mesmerizing to me. I loved the music especially and I thought the animation did a very good job of getting the story across without any dialog. See what you think? On a side note, I had this on Radio Shack's version of the Mind's Eye on VHS. I never got the LD or the LD version of the Mind's Eye which I wish I could find now that I have a LD player. I absolutely LOVE the music in The Mind's Eye and Beyond The Mind's Eye videos. I would sometimes just put these in to go to sleep on.
  20. 2 points
    chas10e

    How Often Do You Play Board Games?

    took this pic awhile ago ...figgered it'd make good wall paper every once inawhile they will fall off the little ledger I have there I look for 'em at thrifts open 'em up the instructions usually have a parts list so I'll take the time too see if it's complete I try and find stuff from the earliest patent of the game (like first editions I guess) ... IMHO ... if it looks old its pretty cool ... my family doesn't alway agree ... I still haven't played my 1934 Monopoly yet ;"( for family gatherings I usually take 4 or 5 games with me. they also have favorites of their own. some winners I brought were "The Amazing Race", "Score Four", "Trouble", "Dynamite Shack" ... they always have a "scabble-off" "Settlers of Catan" ( or just Catan ) is wildly popular the card games like D&D ain't my thing I would like to learn how to play "Go" I have one with the stones & all .... one of these days I guess
  21. 2 points
    btbfilms76

    7800 Avenue

    SNK / Atari Ikari Warriors
  22. 2 points
    New Episode- Ikari Warriors 7800
  23. 1 point
    RickR

    Squad Challenge - Ms. Pac-Man (Atari 7800)

    @RadioPoultry, it looks like you could record your gameplay on VHS. I think that makes you the automatic winner.
  24. 1 point
    To all those waiting out the pandemic: stay healthy, safe, and home if you can. Thanks. 🙂
  25. 1 point
    I'm in! You ought to do a 2600 Ms. Pac-Man Squad Challenge along side this one, too 😉
  26. 1 point
    chas10e

    Squad Challenge - Go Fish! (Atari 2600)

    Congets @RickR ! I hadn't played many INTV games, never played "Shark shark" so I can't compare the two. Yeah "Go Fish" seemed to start slow waiting in the weeds for some morsel to swim by last night I had troubles with the electric eels and didn't improve my score 😬 just when I thought things were going good too Oh well ... there's always the next squad challenge
  27. 1 point
    Ms. Pac-Man episode on 7800 Ave.
  28. 1 point
    RickR

    Samus Ragequits Metroid Vid

    I completely agree with this. It works, but it makes the game a touch more frustrating than it needs to be. Maybe it's just me and my limited amount of time to play games, but I can't stand when it takes a lot of trial and error just to progress. A challenge is fine, but I don't have a lot of time to waste.
  29. 1 point
    kamakazi20012

    Samus Ragequits Metroid Vid

    Hehe...here's another Metroid related one.
  30. 1 point
    "Where did YOU learn to fly?"
  31. 1 point
    Willie!

    Arcade USA

    Pretty cool shoot em' up from Prisma Games! System Invaders!
  32. 1 point
    kamakazi20012

    Game Development Guide - Part 2

    WHAT ARE GAME DEVELOPERS? Game developers are to the video game world what Disney is to the animation world. In short that is. "Oh Great! You just had to scare me out of doing something like this!" Not at all. That's not the reason why I said what I said. It's actually the truth. In modern times video games are made by a team between 3 to 2,000 people or more, each responsible for specific tasks during a game's production progress from start, which is the initial concept, all the way to the final product, which would be the games we choose to purchase and play. It can take anywhere from a few months to a few years for a single game to be ready for the public to view and play. During the Atari days most games were done by one person, sometimes a few more, but nothing on the scale of what is used today. So, just for simplicity sake we will stick with a single imaginary person named Joe. THE GAME CONCEPT Joe has a game idea in his head inspired by two of his favorite games and he thinks a collaboration of both would make for a great new game that he would enjoy playing. He grabs some scarp paper and begins drawing out a few character designs along with short notes saying things like colors to use, what this or that is for, what this or that is suppose to be, and other things. Before Joe knows it he has created a whole universe centered around one game idea. What Joe doesn't realize at this point is he just gave birth to a game world that is his and his alone. Only he knows about it, only he has seen it, only he can revisit it anytime. He also has the ability to change or modify this world. It's his to control and give life to. And that's why the concept portion is the most important part of game designing. It is at this part in game development where ideas are born, characters are made up, environments, and even entire worlds and universes, are made up, along with the stories that make each part of the game's design come together. Everything thought up at this point should have some relation to other objects or environments put down. If something doesn't make much sense at the moment don't scrap it but instead set it aside because it might come in handy later. You might make a killer looking UFO with no purpose starting out but realize later that one of your levels in a space shooter is missing a level boss. Ah HA! Now try to put that UFO in your game to be used as that missing level boss. This part of game design comes from the story made in the first part of this guide. It's why I waited so long to get the second part down. It was to give time for stories to be made and for them to make some sort of sense, have a purpose, have a goal in mind, things like that. It also allowed myself time to come up with a game idea I could use to get ideas across. The concept building part is going to be the hardest portion because of transferring ideas from imagination down on to a sheet, or sheets, of paper. What is seen by the imagination is not always easy to get on paper exactly as it was seen. GAME DEVELOPERS ARE MORE THAN DISNEY ANIMATORS It's true. All Disney animators have to do is draw, frame by frame, the artwork that makes up an animated movie and make sure the animation flows well and is in time with the soundtrack. I'm sure there's more to it than that but that's the basics. A game developer has a lot more to do, however, because not only do they have to come up with the concept but they will also be involved in getting the game programmed, putting the artwork in a form the targeted hardware can understand and use, get any sound effects and/or music just right, make sure controls work as intended...the list goes on and on. Why? Because unlike a Disney animated film a video game is an interactive form of art. All of the visuals on the screen have to be drawn by someone, all the sounds and music someone has to make, someone has to animate what needs to be animated like a ship firing or enemies flying around, someone has to make sure the controls work as planned. And once that is done there are bound to be bugs or issues to have to resolve along the way and someone will have to deal with that. It doesn't matter how old or new a game is someone, somewhere, put their heart and soul into the work they are presenting in a single game for others to enjoy. In most cases of modern video games most of the work and artwork goes by unnoticed. If you are playing a game sometime where you can actually stop for a second to soak in the artwork of the environment by all means stop and take a good look. It took my wife and I playing Borderlands 2 over and over for a couple of years to see a few details we never seen before. And they were cool to look at. Getting back to Joe...in Joe's case he is most likely going to be the artist, animator, musician, sound studio, environment creator, game tester, and game debugger all rolled into one. In short, Joe is going to be the only one making the game so he will be doing everything. This may not be the case for everyone but we are going to just say Joe is making his game by himself. GRAPH PAPER AND PENCILS ARE OUR FRIENDS Two things I highly recommend keeping around are graph paper and pencil. Graph paper especially. With graph paper you can easily draw out art to be used in a video game in a pixel-like form by shading in the squares on the paper. When the shaded boxes are combined the visuals of what was in your imagination should be seen. Sometimes you might have to look at the graph paper from a distance when you are finished drawing but it should still be somewhat visible. Use the eraser to remove some areas that are not quite right, shade in others that might help, make use of the eraser and empty squares to get the details right. These two items will never go dead from a drained battery, the paper can never get attacked by malware or viruses, however the paper can run low and the pencil will need to be sharpened or, if using a mechanical pencil, may need lead refills. That's about the extent of what can go wrong using paper and pencil...unless you have a goat that likes to eat paper. TO SPRITE OR NOT TO SPRITE? Sprites? No not the soft drink. A sprite in video games is the artwork that makes up a single character to be used in a game. Let's use Centipede for an example. The player's character called "The Wand" is a sprite, the spider and scorpion are sprites, the mushrooms are sprites...even the Centipede is made up of a series of sprites. Those are all sprites. Don't let it confuse you because not everything in a video game has to be a sprite but the controlled characters in a video game are almost always sprites. On an Atari console/computer a single sprite is usually made up of 8x8, 16x16, and 32x32 sprite grids. What is a grid? Oh, I guess I'm jumping ahead of myself. A sprite grid is the enclosed area used to draw an object to be used in a game project. We will use the 8x8 grid as our example. In the 8x8 grid are 64 "dots" known as pixels. Each square on the graph paper within a 8x8 sprite grid represents a pixel. A pixel is the single dot of a TV screen that is lit up. The first number, 8 as an example, is the number of squares or pixels from left to right or horizontally. The second number, 8 again, is the number of squares or pixels from top to bottom, or vertically. In our 8x8 sprite grid we have 8 squares horizontally and 8 squares vertically giving us a total of 64 squares we can place any pixel or series of pixels. To create a sprite grid on a sheet of graph paper draw a vertical line on one side eight blocks down. Double check your counting because it is very easy to miscount the squares on graph paper if they are really small. Next, starting at the top of the line you just made draw to the right eight squares. If done correctly you should have somewhat of a triangle made. Now starting at the right end of the line you just made across go down eight squares. When finished you should have a box with an open bottom. Finally, close the box...make a line from the bottom of both lines on the left and right. VIOLA!! You just created an 8x8 (pronounced eight by eight) sprite grid. This small grid gives a total of 64 squares that can be used to design characters, objects, and other aspects of a game. Depending on your project's requirements, and the targeted hardware's abilities and limitations the project is being designed for, sprite grids can be many different sizes. Some systems allow for 8x16 sprites, some allow for sprites much larger than 32x32, it all depends on finding that fine line between what your imagination wants to see and the abilities of the hardware you are wanting to design for. The bigger the sprite grid in both directions the more detail that can be expressed. If you have ever wondered why Mario on an NES game is not as detailed as Mario on the Super NES it's because of the sprite grid size. Granted, sometimes Mario looks good, sometimes he doesn't, but it's all down to the grid size that was used to create him. The same goes for Atari games, too. Just be sure to research the max sprite size the targeted hardware can handle or you may find yourself going back to the drawing board. BONUS TIME: Atari Fonts, as well as most computerized letters and numbers, are small sprites preprogrammed into the computer's hardware. These are usually 8x8. However, have you ever wondered about the extra small sprites found on some Atari games, especially on the Atari 7800 games? Those are on a 3x5 sprite grid. Try it out sometime...make some 3x5 sprite grids on graph paper and try to draw out every letter and number of the English alphabet in those. Also, the Atari 2600 & 7800, unlike the Atari computers and 5200, do not have any fonts programmed into them. Those have to be done by the programmer and put in their games. So if you are designing a game for the 2600 or 7800 you might as well start making your own letters and numbers to be used in your game now. HOW TO USE A SPRITE GRID Now that you have a sprite grid how do you use it? This is the easy part. Using your pencil...fill in a square somewhere in the grid. That square you just filled in represents a pixel you would like "on" on the TV screen during the actual programming phase of your game project. Each one of those squares on your graph paper inside that sprite grid represents a series of pixels that will be used by the hardware to put your sprite on the screen at some point. If you want an airplane draw an airplane as best as you can. It doesn't have to be perfect and you can add and erase any shaded square at any time. This is why this part of a game's development is so important. This is laying out all of the artwork that will make up the visuals of the game. It's your game, your world, your baby, get it all out. If you find yourself stuck take a break and come back to it later. Ideas will hit you when you least expect it. HOW TO MAKE ENVIRONMENTS To do an environment, say like a side scrolling level like in Mario for example, you would put multiple 8x8 sprite grids together all the way across the paper from left to right. Each 8x8 sprite grid will be a small puzzle piece used later to build up the environment. You can use larger grid sizes later but for now let's keep it simple. Use 8x8 sprite grids and I would probably limit yourself to using a total of eight sprite grids. Are you starting to see a pattern here? END OF PART 2 And that concludes the second part of this guide. We actually went over a lot of stuff. Hopefully that will be enough to get started. It should be enough to get the game imagined inside your mind on paper and closer to reality. Remember...it's your world. Build it up as you see it and as you see fit. Again, if something doesn't fit right away set it aside for future use. And, above all, have fun! I'm going to post this now and then I will come back later to add reference images. I still need to make those 😉
  33. 1 point
    Willie!

    Arcade USA

    Thanks to all who attended the 8000 sub livestream last night 🙂 Congrats to the winner RB1033 as well!
  34. 1 point
    kamakazi20012

    Coronaville Song

    I couldn't help but share this when my wife found it. Enjoy!
  35. 1 point
    WINNER: RadioPoultry Ms. Pac-Man Atari 7800 March 27, 2020 ROUND 1: @RadioPoultry ROUND 2: @Justin ROUND 3: @RadioPoultry It took us a little while to find a game we both had available, but we settled on Ms. Pac-Man, which might be my favorite game for the 7800. The top score of the battle was 55,310 on the final round. Thank you Justin, let's do this again soon! And if anyone else would like to challenge me to a game, just send me a message!
  36. 1 point
    🎧 Currently listening to The Psychedelic Furs - Heartbreak Beat
  37. 1 point
    It's not 80's but still fun to watch. I had two VHS tapes (remember those?) titled Beyond The Mind's Eye and one from Radio Shack titled The Mind's Eye. Both were compilations of early computer generated visuals set to some of the most creative music I've ever heard. This clip I'm sharing was one of my favorites from Beyond The Mind's Eye titled "Too Far". It might be from the 1990's but it retains that 1980's flare. It's also a time where computers were transitioning from being a luxury item into being a common place item in everything we do. Enjoy the short clip.
  38. 1 point
    hi everyone, lance www.atarisales.com
  39. 1 point
    yep, its a fun machine. lance www.atarisales.com
  40. 1 point
    BlackCatz40

    Game Development Guide

    Interesting stuff. I will keep checking in here. Thanks. 🙂
  41. 1 point
    Justin

    7800 Avenue

    GREAT to see new episodes of 7800 Avenue! It's been a while. Best 7800 show out there bud!
  42. 1 point
    hi everyone, good 2600 game also! lance www.atarisales.com
  43. 1 point
    hi everyone, by far, the best of the three. lance www.atarisales.com
  44. 1 point
    Willie!

    Arcade USA

    Interesting game from the early 80's by CinemaTronics!
  45. 1 point
    hi everyone, to many to list, but i will start out with streets of fire, the Philadelphia experiment, and into the night. lance www.atarisales.com
  46. 1 point
    Willie!

    Arcade USA

    Time for a new Ramblin's N Pickup video!
  47. 1 point
    Willie!

    Arcade USA

    Bustin' those Ghosties with Namco's Golly Ghost! on this episode of Playin' the MameCade! This is one of the few ticket redemption arcade games I enjoyed back in the 90's
  48. 1 point
    Mike, from Gamer Logic, found a folder full of Press Release materials for the Atari Jaguar from the years 1992 and 1994 at a store that was closing. Check out the video below...
  49. 1 point
    Willie!

    Arcade USA

    A old Atari 8 bit favorite now playable on the Atari 5200!
  50. 1 point
    I totally get what you're saying Justin. I remember not really trying Mario 64 until after some of the 3D computer classics like Descent, Wolfenstein, Doom, Magic Carpet, etc. So I'm kind of in the same boat. The game itself is a technical marvel, but the gameplay seems a little dry and maybe even tired. Still, it's the presentation that makes the game a masterpiece. The opening screen with Mario's giant 3D head and voice is still amazing to see. Nintendo knew how to dress-up their games, that's for sure.
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