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CrossBow

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  1. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from Justin in Ivory Tower Collections - 2016 Edition   
    Thank you! It isn't nearly as large a collection as many others I know of even here where I live. But I mainly collect the games I've wanted through time and not so much trying to collect for completion. After all, that would be a never ending goal and one that I simply wouldn't have the fund, time, nor the energy these days to try and keep up with!
     
    But thank you again.
  2. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from socrates63 in Ivory Tower Collections - 2016 Edition   
    This was done last year but you get the idea. Few games here and there have been added but essentially this is my room of fun for the whole family!
     

  3. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from Ballblaɀer in Ivory Tower Collections - 2016 Edition   
    This was done last year but you get the idea. Few games here and there have been added but essentially this is my room of fun for the whole family!
     

  4. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from jmjustin6 in Ivory Tower Collections - 2016 Edition   
    This was done last year but you get the idea. Few games here and there have been added but essentially this is my room of fun for the whole family!
     

  5. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from MaximumRD in Ivory Tower Collections - 2016 Edition   
    This was done last year but you get the idea. Few games here and there have been added but essentially this is my room of fun for the whole family!
     

  6. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from Lost Dragon in Ivory Tower Collections - 2016 Edition   
    This was done last year but you get the idea. Few games here and there have been added but essentially this is my room of fun for the whole family!
     

  7. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from Arenafoot in Ivory Tower Collections - 2016 Edition   
    This was done last year but you get the idea. Few games here and there have been added but essentially this is my room of fun for the whole family!
     

  8. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from Sabertooth in Ivory Tower Collections - 2016 Edition   
    This was done last year but you get the idea. Few games here and there have been added but essentially this is my room of fun for the whole family!
     

  9. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from LeeJ07 in May 18, 1980 -- The day Mt. St. Helens blew   
    I honestly don't remember this as I would have only been about 6 years old at the time. In fact, when I think back on things, I really can't remember much of anything that far back other than a few memories of when I was about 7 years old and go my first Atari in about Christmas of '81 or '82, and then most of my memories seem to be in check starting around 1984 when I was about 9 - 10 years old.
  10. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from Justin in May 18, 1980 -- The day Mt. St. Helens blew   
    I honestly don't remember this as I would have only been about 6 years old at the time. In fact, when I think back on things, I really can't remember much of anything that far back other than a few memories of when I was about 7 years old and go my first Atari in about Christmas of '81 or '82, and then most of my memories seem to be in check starting around 1984 when I was about 9 - 10 years old.
  11. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from Justin in Vintage Stoves & Ovens   
    Actually that GE wall oven could very well be from the 80s. I recall we lived in a house that was built in the mid 80s and had an oven similar to that. We replaced with a new hotpoint that look nearly like that GE only it was black but still had the same clock/timer combo..etc.
     
    As for older houses with wall oven's being tough to replace, you aren't kidding! My current house was built in '65. The Kitchen has been remodeled at least once in that time so I'm not sure what it originally looked like, but I suspect the wall over was added into a cabinet it would seem. We changed all the appliances out in the kitchen with newer. The current wall oven and stove top were early 90's Jenn-Air units. Replaced them with newer Bosch but it was really tough to get a wall over we both liked and had the features we wanted because the original space was only made for a 27" inch wall over. Most Wall ovens today are of the 30" variety. It was another reason we went with Bosch since they had a 27" in model that had the features we wanted. We still had to get it special ordered from Bosch, but they at least offered such a sized model.
  12. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from RickR in Vintage Stoves & Ovens   
    Actually that GE wall oven could very well be from the 80s. I recall we lived in a house that was built in the mid 80s and had an oven similar to that. We replaced with a new hotpoint that look nearly like that GE only it was black but still had the same clock/timer combo..etc.
     
    As for older houses with wall oven's being tough to replace, you aren't kidding! My current house was built in '65. The Kitchen has been remodeled at least once in that time so I'm not sure what it originally looked like, but I suspect the wall over was added into a cabinet it would seem. We changed all the appliances out in the kitchen with newer. The current wall oven and stove top were early 90's Jenn-Air units. Replaced them with newer Bosch but it was really tough to get a wall over we both liked and had the features we wanted because the original space was only made for a 27" inch wall over. Most Wall ovens today are of the 30" variety. It was another reason we went with Bosch since they had a 27" in model that had the features we wanted. We still had to get it special ordered from Bosch, but they at least offered such a sized model.
  13. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from Justin in Finally did the AV Mod on my Coleco   
    I used to use the Ben Heck mod in my CV but had saturation issues all the time, plus the transistor would get stupid hot! Found out from a post at AA that while Ben's mod does work. it isn't correct in regards to voltage and the transistor gets so hot because of the 12v going into it. Eventually the transistor will burn out before its time if you play the CV often. In the end I took it all out and bought one of Yurkie's AV boards but just the board. That way it replaced the simple circuit show for the Ben Heck mod, and I still use the RCA jacks I installed on the back. Looks much better than the simple mod here and best of all, no heat being built up anywhere.
  14. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from Justin in UAV - Ultimate Atari Video - Atari 7800 Installation   
    New video is online for the 7800 UAV installation overview. Includes video footage of several games in action through the s-video out this thing produces.
     

  15. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from RickR in UAV - Ultimate Atari Video - Atari 7800 Installation   
    New video is online for the 7800 UAV installation overview. Includes video footage of several games in action through the s-video out this thing produces.
     

  16. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from RickR in The Cheap CX-52 Controller Refurbishing Process   
    The flatblade screwdriver trick I also do. Especially if I'm just wanting to quickly check there aren't any broken ground traces between the top function buttons and side fire buttons. The video was done in a way that it shows a complete breakdown of the controller, and about the best way to verify the traces in the flex circuit are good to go before going to the trouble of anything else. 
     
    I also mentioned Defender as a good candidate for testing both fire buttons since it does use them for smart bomb and fire functions. Blaster is the best since you have to use all analog control, plus all the fire buttons will fire the laser shots.
     
    For quick and dirty calibration or to test the calibration of a particular controller, I will pop in missile command and star wars:TAG to see where the cross hairs are when powering on the console. They should be roughly in the in the middle of the screen horizontally and just off center to the right about an 1/8 of the screen thereabouts. Not scientific, but that is enough to get the job done.
     
    Best games for testing the potentiometer movements are bounty bob (If you have one), and Gyruss. If your pots are out of alignment too much, then it is really touch to control the ship in a nice smooth circle around the screen on gyruss.
  17. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from RickR in The Cheap CX-52 Controller Refurbishing Process   
    Taking out the flex isn't that big a deal honestly. In fact, I prefer the Rev 7 flex above all others because the traces are wider and hence thicker and seem able to hold up to the stress better. The Rev 9's I've seen had a sorta graphite trace in them and I'm sure it didn't corrode, but you also can't take the eraser method to it either as it will literally erase the traces when you try and clean them. Also the graphite ones are much more brittle on their traces.
     
    Now, having said that, I've seen my fair share of Rev 7's where the traces, especially by the fire buttons, begin to literally warp up off the flex. Again, not a whole lot you can do except to carefully press them back down as best you can. The foil tape I use seems to stick onto the buttons pretty well provided you clean the dots first as I do in the video. Yes, eventually the foil tape will drop off those buttons, but again it was about 4 years before that began to happen to my first one I did using the stuff. I've been told even after 3 years, that the gold rebuilt kits still require cleaning to get them going again. I prefer using the foil since it is essentially the same metal as the original traces and hence the corrosion isn't as bad because you don't have dissimilar metals against each other.
  18. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from RickR in The Cheap CX-52 Controller Refurbishing Process   
    There has been quite a bit of discussion both on and off the AA forums it seems lately, regarding the CX-52 controllers that were standard with the Atari 5200 Super System. Years ago I made up a pretty detailed PDF of the process I use to clean and refurbish them. I was one of the originators of the foil tape method, using it several years before I even discovered other Atari fans on the internet back in the mid 90s. So..here is a very detailed video of the process I go through on each 5200 controller that passes by me that has buttons that don't respond. And yes, I use the 3M brand foil tape method and have for years. Each controller I've done lasts typically about 3 to 4 years before it needs to be done again. Not a bad track record...
     

  19. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from greenween in The Cheap CX-52 Controller Refurbishing Process   
    There has been quite a bit of discussion both on and off the AA forums it seems lately, regarding the CX-52 controllers that were standard with the Atari 5200 Super System. Years ago I made up a pretty detailed PDF of the process I use to clean and refurbish them. I was one of the originators of the foil tape method, using it several years before I even discovered other Atari fans on the internet back in the mid 90s. So..here is a very detailed video of the process I go through on each 5200 controller that passes by me that has buttons that don't respond. And yes, I use the 3M brand foil tape method and have for years. Each controller I've done lasts typically about 3 to 4 years before it needs to be done again. Not a bad track record...
     

  20. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from The Professor in The Cheap CX-52 Controller Refurbishing Process   
    There has been quite a bit of discussion both on and off the AA forums it seems lately, regarding the CX-52 controllers that were standard with the Atari 5200 Super System. Years ago I made up a pretty detailed PDF of the process I use to clean and refurbish them. I was one of the originators of the foil tape method, using it several years before I even discovered other Atari fans on the internet back in the mid 90s. So..here is a very detailed video of the process I go through on each 5200 controller that passes by me that has buttons that don't respond. And yes, I use the 3M brand foil tape method and have for years. Each controller I've done lasts typically about 3 to 4 years before it needs to be done again. Not a bad track record...
     

  21. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from Justin in Recapping a Sega CD Model 1 = NOT FUN!   
    Right..so for those that might not know, I've recapped quite a bit over the years. Started off with arcade monitors, and then eventually to consoles like the Genesis, TurboDUO..etc. And this weekend I decided I would give my model 1 Sega CD a recap job.
     
    The basic kit includes all you need from Console5.com. And nothing is terribly difficult to get to to actually do the work.
     
    I do advised that in the case of the model 1 Sega CD that it be done, if for no other reason, than the main CD logic interface to genesis board has many SMD caps on it and in the case of my Sega CD these were all starting to leak and I was able to remove most of them with my bare hands and hardly any force required! Again, they were apparently starting to leak, so it was a good thing I decided to do this.
     
    That being said, while the task of recapping the audio and main logic board were easy enough. The CD mech and laser assembly...is the one item I advise you to NOT TOUCH! The kits included caps for either the JVC or Sony CD mechs as well. But I was warned about doing this and didn't heed that apparently.
     
    So here is the problem with recapping the laser mech. First the caps themselves depending on the CD model are kinda up in the mech so you have to be careful about that. Also the caps only solder from the bottom side of the board so that shouldn't be a problem. The problem is that recapping the thing will change things electrically on the CD mech. As a result the CD laser has to be re-tuned to compensate and this is where problems arise. In my case I couldn't even get to a point to try and tune the laser because it appears the new caps were allowing more current to flow to the laser head. As a result the laser actually burned out pretty much as soon as I powered everything on. And yes I checked the polarity of the caps and values. The only difference in the caps of the new vs the old was voltage as the larger caps being 330uf were only 16v and 6.3v originally and the replacements are 330uf 25v caps. But I can't imagine that being a problem. Anyway, only but luck did I have a spare Sega CD model 1 assembly that has a broken tray mech. But the laser assembly was good so I was able to swap them out and it was good to go again.
     
    So you should recap the rest of the stuff..but for the love of everything you hold sacred! Do NOT touch the caps on the main CD drive and Laser mech. In fact the originals on the Sony were Nichicons and likely didn't need to be replaced anyway.
     
  22. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from RickR in Recapping a Sega CD Model 1 = NOT FUN!   
    Game Gear recaps aren't that tough. I've done a few. The audio board is the one that suffers the most from the SMD caps it has on it. the power board has through hole caps on it already so that isn't that tough and the main logic board uses what look like surface mount caps, but are actually normal radial through hole caps that have been surface soldered and then folded over into these small plastic housings. Hard to explain, but...it isn't too bad. I do something a little different than most when I recap. When using radial in place of surface mount, most will bend the leads to little L shapes and solder those down. That is fine, but the cap still sticks up doing this. What I do, if space allows, is to fold the leads along one side so it looks like this along the side of the cap " || " and then from those I bend them back down to make the little L shapes. Doing this, allows me to solder them onto the surface pads, and then fold the cap over on its side back over the leads so little space is used. Might be hard to explain but I haven't any pictures on hand currently to show what I'm talking about.
     
    Capping a GG is perhaps more time consuming than a Lynx, but not too bad. Oh..wait..here is my video I did of the process to get an idea:
     
    https://youtu.be/WUq3Vtpj_nk?list=PLypzYHeVZt9mmepsDRL-2oBIemEfp0XdC
     
     
    What I haven't attempted yet, but I do have the parts on hand for...is the McWill LCD for a Game Gear. I already did my lynx and that wasn't too bad. But the GG requires removal and replacement of some of the SMD components, plus the wires to get the video signals to the LCD mod have to be soldered to really tiny traces. At least...to my 40+ year old eyes they are really tiny. So I've been hedging on doing that one. One day... (Soon I hope as getting older won't make it easier...), I will get it done.
     
    But recapping the GG and Lynx is about an hour to do if you do it properly. I take a little longer that most I'm sure, but then I make sure the pads are cleaned..and double check my work. I have a much better success rate of first time working than not because I take my time when doing mods and repairs.
  23. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from RickR in Recapping a Sega CD Model 1 = NOT FUN!   
    Right..so for those that might not know, I've recapped quite a bit over the years. Started off with arcade monitors, and then eventually to consoles like the Genesis, TurboDUO..etc. And this weekend I decided I would give my model 1 Sega CD a recap job.
     
    The basic kit includes all you need from Console5.com. And nothing is terribly difficult to get to to actually do the work.
     
    I do advised that in the case of the model 1 Sega CD that it be done, if for no other reason, than the main CD logic interface to genesis board has many SMD caps on it and in the case of my Sega CD these were all starting to leak and I was able to remove most of them with my bare hands and hardly any force required! Again, they were apparently starting to leak, so it was a good thing I decided to do this.
     
    That being said, while the task of recapping the audio and main logic board were easy enough. The CD mech and laser assembly...is the one item I advise you to NOT TOUCH! The kits included caps for either the JVC or Sony CD mechs as well. But I was warned about doing this and didn't heed that apparently.
     
    So here is the problem with recapping the laser mech. First the caps themselves depending on the CD model are kinda up in the mech so you have to be careful about that. Also the caps only solder from the bottom side of the board so that shouldn't be a problem. The problem is that recapping the thing will change things electrically on the CD mech. As a result the CD laser has to be re-tuned to compensate and this is where problems arise. In my case I couldn't even get to a point to try and tune the laser because it appears the new caps were allowing more current to flow to the laser head. As a result the laser actually burned out pretty much as soon as I powered everything on. And yes I checked the polarity of the caps and values. The only difference in the caps of the new vs the old was voltage as the larger caps being 330uf were only 16v and 6.3v originally and the replacements are 330uf 25v caps. But I can't imagine that being a problem. Anyway, only but luck did I have a spare Sega CD model 1 assembly that has a broken tray mech. But the laser assembly was good so I was able to swap them out and it was good to go again.
     
    So you should recap the rest of the stuff..but for the love of everything you hold sacred! Do NOT touch the caps on the main CD drive and Laser mech. In fact the originals on the Sony were Nichicons and likely didn't need to be replaced anyway.
     
  24. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from MaximumRD in Recapping a Sega CD Model 1 = NOT FUN!   
    Right..so for those that might not know, I've recapped quite a bit over the years. Started off with arcade monitors, and then eventually to consoles like the Genesis, TurboDUO..etc. And this weekend I decided I would give my model 1 Sega CD a recap job.
     
    The basic kit includes all you need from Console5.com. And nothing is terribly difficult to get to to actually do the work.
     
    I do advised that in the case of the model 1 Sega CD that it be done, if for no other reason, than the main CD logic interface to genesis board has many SMD caps on it and in the case of my Sega CD these were all starting to leak and I was able to remove most of them with my bare hands and hardly any force required! Again, they were apparently starting to leak, so it was a good thing I decided to do this.
     
    That being said, while the task of recapping the audio and main logic board were easy enough. The CD mech and laser assembly...is the one item I advise you to NOT TOUCH! The kits included caps for either the JVC or Sony CD mechs as well. But I was warned about doing this and didn't heed that apparently.
     
    So here is the problem with recapping the laser mech. First the caps themselves depending on the CD model are kinda up in the mech so you have to be careful about that. Also the caps only solder from the bottom side of the board so that shouldn't be a problem. The problem is that recapping the thing will change things electrically on the CD mech. As a result the CD laser has to be re-tuned to compensate and this is where problems arise. In my case I couldn't even get to a point to try and tune the laser because it appears the new caps were allowing more current to flow to the laser head. As a result the laser actually burned out pretty much as soon as I powered everything on. And yes I checked the polarity of the caps and values. The only difference in the caps of the new vs the old was voltage as the larger caps being 330uf were only 16v and 6.3v originally and the replacements are 330uf 25v caps. But I can't imagine that being a problem. Anyway, only but luck did I have a spare Sega CD model 1 assembly that has a broken tray mech. But the laser assembly was good so I was able to swap them out and it was good to go again.
     
    So you should recap the rest of the stuff..but for the love of everything you hold sacred! Do NOT touch the caps on the main CD drive and Laser mech. In fact the originals on the Sony were Nichicons and likely didn't need to be replaced anyway.
     
  25. Like
    CrossBow got a reaction from Rowsdower70 in Recapping a Sega CD Model 1 = NOT FUN!   
    Right..so for those that might not know, I've recapped quite a bit over the years. Started off with arcade monitors, and then eventually to consoles like the Genesis, TurboDUO..etc. And this weekend I decided I would give my model 1 Sega CD a recap job.
     
    The basic kit includes all you need from Console5.com. And nothing is terribly difficult to get to to actually do the work.
     
    I do advised that in the case of the model 1 Sega CD that it be done, if for no other reason, than the main CD logic interface to genesis board has many SMD caps on it and in the case of my Sega CD these were all starting to leak and I was able to remove most of them with my bare hands and hardly any force required! Again, they were apparently starting to leak, so it was a good thing I decided to do this.
     
    That being said, while the task of recapping the audio and main logic board were easy enough. The CD mech and laser assembly...is the one item I advise you to NOT TOUCH! The kits included caps for either the JVC or Sony CD mechs as well. But I was warned about doing this and didn't heed that apparently.
     
    So here is the problem with recapping the laser mech. First the caps themselves depending on the CD model are kinda up in the mech so you have to be careful about that. Also the caps only solder from the bottom side of the board so that shouldn't be a problem. The problem is that recapping the thing will change things electrically on the CD mech. As a result the CD laser has to be re-tuned to compensate and this is where problems arise. In my case I couldn't even get to a point to try and tune the laser because it appears the new caps were allowing more current to flow to the laser head. As a result the laser actually burned out pretty much as soon as I powered everything on. And yes I checked the polarity of the caps and values. The only difference in the caps of the new vs the old was voltage as the larger caps being 330uf were only 16v and 6.3v originally and the replacements are 330uf 25v caps. But I can't imagine that being a problem. Anyway, only but luck did I have a spare Sega CD model 1 assembly that has a broken tray mech. But the laser assembly was good so I was able to swap them out and it was good to go again.
     
    So you should recap the rest of the stuff..but for the love of everything you hold sacred! Do NOT touch the caps on the main CD drive and Laser mech. In fact the originals on the Sony were Nichicons and likely didn't need to be replaced anyway.
     
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