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DegasElite

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  1. Like
    DegasElite reacted to RickR in Damaged boxes - To tape or not to tape?   
    Question:  How do you feel about using tape on boxes?  I'm talking about boxes that have some serious tears or squishing issues.  Do you use tape or some other less destructive form of restoration?
     
    Case in point is the Chiplifter box I acquired lately.  It was flattened in the worst possible way...with a crease right down the center of the sides.  Pretty much impossible to get it back into a "box" form without some help.  I ended up adding some tape to the bottom to help stiffen/flatten it, then used a glue stick to get the bottom back "sealed" (which gave it some structural integrity).  Also, I taped the top flap -- you see this kind of tear in a LOT of 5200 boxes.  The top does stay closed now, but yes, you can see the tape on the outside.
     
    Anyways, in my opinion, I took something that was basically trash and made it more presentable.  Yes, the tape is now a part of the item....it can't be removed without damage. 
     
    What do you all think?
     
     




  2. Like
    DegasElite reacted to Atari Adventure Square in Damaged boxes - To tape or not to tape?   
    I have a few scrunched boxes and always figured I could give their proper form back by cutting a box-shaped styroform form to fill em back up and take it from there.
     
    Personally, the boxes are the most valuable thing in some way.
    Just seeing them brings the feels and the vibes to life.
     
    If any tape was to be used, it'd be transparent scotch or an even spread of wide cardboard tape.
     
    Although, I did a Modge Podge project for a relative over the holidays and it's rather great for creating a transparent protective shell (it's a glue that dries quickly enough and can be used for collages and such).
    I'd bet you could fill out the box with styrofoam (or anything) to flatten out the surface then use Modge Podge to harden it up.
    There are different types of this glue for smooth, textured or matte surfaces.
     
    But yeah, these groovy old game boxes are works of art.
    They deserve preservation.
     
    ...
     
    They...
     
    ...
     
    ...Belong In A Museum!!!
  3. Like
    DegasElite reacted to Justin in Kay-Bee Memories   
    Thinking back to good times at Kay-Bee Toy Stores in the mall. My first Atari came from Sears, but almost every game I ever bought for Atari, Nintendo, all the way up through Dreamcast, most often came from Kay-Bee in our local mall. It's always fun to share these memories this time of year. Hope you guys have some fond Kay-Bee memories too!
     
     

     
     
     

     
     
     
    http://youtu.be/cB_cAK8CbXA
     
    Kay-Bee Toy Stores Commercial for Atari Games and Systems (1986)
     
     
     

     
     
     

     
     
     

     
     
     

     
     
     

     
     
     

  4. Like
    DegasElite reacted to Atari 5200 Guy in Kay-Bee Memories   
    The only KayBee Toys was, then, a two-hour plus drive away from my hometown.  Mom and I would pay a visit to Springfield, Missouri and the Battlefield Mall where K*B had a store.  The only game I know for sure I got from there was Rock N Ball on clearance...but I don't remember how much it was.  After that we would visit Smitty's and Ventures...two stores that I don't believe are around any more sadly.  Man things were sooo much better than back then including the stores.  They each had their own characteristics that is missing from today's retail stores.  K*B was a special treat just like Jeff Spega (Tron and Robotron) visiting the Acme when he was younger.  
  5. Like
    DegasElite reacted to Atari 5200 Guy in 2600 Was A Little Under The Weather   
    Hey Atari.IO Members!
     
    Well...I have to say that my 2600 adventures so far have been full of not-so-pleasant surprises.  After replacing the four switches with shiny new ones, and replacing the difficulty switch that was broken, the system started showing that something else was wrong.  I believe that StormSurge might want to read this because I discovered something interesting.
     
    After a few minutes of game play (Radar Lock, Solaris, Enduro were the games used) the system would create this rather weird color interference and then go black and white.  Absolutely no color and a bit of static in the picture.  Turning the system off and back on almost instantly would work for a while but this issue would come back.  
     
    So I started with a few capacitors, the electrolytic type that act like a battery...look like them, too.  Tested the system out.  Now the time before the issue showed itself had shortened.  It didn't take nearly as long as before.  So I give a heavy sigh and do the only thing I know to do.  I googled and downloaded a 2600 Field Service Manual.  Even then my chances of actually finding what was wrong was slim.  
     

     

     
    Using the manual's troubleshooting area it said to replace a bunch of capacitors and gave their numbers.  I did those one at a time and only after testing would I move on to the next capacitor.  I finally took a break from the machine and did something I should have done in the first place.  The service manual has the schematic diagrams on how each component relates to the system.  Knowing that something is keeping the color from working properly I finally decided to check the schematic for the color line leaving the TIA processor.  I had already tried another TIA out of my Junior model and got the same effect so I knew it wasn't the TIA.
     
    On the schematic it shows a couple of capacitors placed in-line with the color signal to the RF modulator (the metal box on the lower-right corner of the board if you've ever seen the 2600's insides).  There's a ceramic cap and fuse placed in-line, and another cap acting as an interference blocker, located right above the RF Modulator.  The one cap acting as that blocker was noticed that one of it's pins connects to a ground.  If the cap is failing there could be a short causing the color to fade out.  So I replace this cap with one of a similar rating.  So far it's been 3 hours and the system has not been going back to black and white if I don't use the TV Type switch.
     
    I'm not 100% certain yet but I may have finally fixed this system's issues.  So not only does it have shiny new switches it also has a few new caps along with a new voltage regulator.  I changed that, too, just in case the old one was not up to its old job any more.  I kept all the old parts should I need them again because there may have been nothing wrong with them other than that last cap.  I hope this console is fixed now...if not I will try again.
     
    For the record...fixing this console has actually been interesting to me so I am having fun fixing it and enjoying solving the problem it is having.  
  6. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from Clint Thompson in Atari Transputer Video   
    I have never seen the Atari Transputer Workstation in action, but I have heard of it beforehand. I think it had four CPU microprocessors in it. It was quite technologically advanced for its time. Now, we have microprocessors that have microprocessors in the form of cores. I wish that we could get more RISC-based desktop computers out on the market. I think that would be the cat's meow (no pun intended XD). That's my two cents. Thanks for letting me share.
  7. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from Lost Dragon in The Classic Atari Arcade Classic Pole Position gets ported to the Atari ST   
    That isn't too shabby a conversion. It is almost arcade-perfect, as the Professor said. I remember "Pole Position" in the arcades as a third-grader. It brings back great memories. The 1980s were a video game Renaissance. This is truly a classic arcade title that will go down in gaming history and I hope that this conversion exemplifies it well, which it should by the look of it. Amazing work!
  8. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from Lost Dragon in Shiny. New. Catboxes.   
    That would be nice if there was a new production run on the CatBoxes again. Those things are worth their weight in gold because they are so scarce right now. If I could afford it, I would buy one.
  9. Like
    DegasElite reacted to Rowsdower70 in Atari 7800 Rewritable Cart Review   
    ...by one of my favorite accents on YouTube, VectrexRoli


  10. Like
    DegasElite reacted to RickR in Xevious   
    Great game.  What do they call those spinning wall things that you can't shoot?  They look really nice on the 7800 version.
  11. Like
    DegasElite reacted to Rowsdower70 in Damaged boxes - To tape or not to tape?   
    My stance on taping, or altering things in any way depend:

    If this is an item I plan on keeping for my own collection, I will tape it up nicely.  I don't care about its resell value, I just concern myself with the longevity of the packaging.

    If this is an item for trade or for flea market/conventions, I won't ever use tape.  I will only make changes I HAVE to make to make transporting the item.   I figure the best bet is always to let the person who gives the item its final home make that call.
  12. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from Atari Adventure Square in Damaged boxes - To tape or not to tape?   
    I agree that they need to be preserved. I wonder if a paper restorer can do that. But, it would be hundreds of dollars per box. That's my guess, anyway. Maybe, in the future, preservation of boxes will become commonplace as they age.
  13. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from RickR in Damaged boxes - To tape or not to tape?   
    By the way, Atari 5200 boxes are notorious for getting easily damaged. It was about the shipping and the heavy cartridges. It did not jive with the box design. Bummer. You should count yourself lucky that you have an original Choplifter box. A boxed Choplifter is extremely rare.
  14. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from Clint Thompson in CT60e Expansion Card for Atari Falcon030…   
    Hi, everybody,
     
    I had heard from a friend and from AtariAge about the news that Rodolphe Czuba, of Czuba-Tech in France, has transferred the license for the CT60 expansion card for the Atari Falcon to someone in Germany. It is going to be redeveloped as the CT60e (the "e" stands for "evolved"). This is a real game changer for the Falcon computer. It could even rival the FireBee with the right stuff in it. I will find out more information about it, but I am understandably curious now. It makes me wish I could afford a Falcon. Bummer. I think that I could find one, though. Eventually…   I wonder. Has anyone heard about this on Atari.io? I am sure some has by now.
  15. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from RickR in Wanted: Feedback For Sentinel & Ninja Golf   
    Hi, everybody,
     
    I have never played "Ninja Golf." I once owned it for a short time, but I found out it was a defective copy when I bought it. So, that was returned to the person I bought it from and I got another game for the 7800. I do own "Sentinel," though. Granted, it is repetitive. But I wouldn't call it a "Trash Game." I would say it is a "Meh" game, but I still like it. The only thing about it is it is extremely difficult. I wish that it had a difficulty setting. That way, practice can be easier on it. I think that the fault is in the light gun itself as far as accuracy is concerned. It is better than a Nintendo Zapper gun, IMHO. I think that the gun might need to be tilted at an angle. But, most targets get hit in games I play. That's my two cents anyway. Thanks for letting me share.
  16. Like
    DegasElite reacted to RickR in Wanted: Feedback For Sentinel & Ninja Golf   
    I haven't played either.
     
    Ninja Golf looks really good -- a wild concept.  I'm glad they included actual combat -- unlike "Lee Trevino's Fighting Golf" for NES. 
  17. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from The Professor in Atari ProLine Joystick Upgrade from Best Electronics: Review…   
    Recently, I was putting through its paces a ProLine Joystick with the Best Electronics gold joystick upgrade in it, designed by Bradley Koda. When I started using it, the difference between that and a standard joystick in performance was like night and day. Compared to a stock ProLine joystick from Atari without the upgrade, well, let’s just say the upgraded joystick blew it away. It handled much better and is more well-rounded.
     
    I can explain. Remember the review I did on “Ikari Warriors” for the 7800? Well, I used the upgraded joystick. That was the reason why I achieved my personal best score ever recorded in that game. I also use a European Atari 7800 joypad. Now, on “Ikari Warriors,” the joypad plays quite sluggishly as opposed to the upgraded joystick. The movement on the joystick after upgrades is much smoother. There is definitely less hassle.
     
    But, the joystick can handle too smoothly on other games. I was playing “Taz” with it once, and I achieved a lower score and could not get over a certain point in the game. I do admit, however, that I need to play “Taz” more. I guess I need more practice with that upgraded controller. Overall, as some would say, this controller is the bee’s knees.
     
    Here’s how it works. Normally, the innards of your joystick are made with four cheap metal button-like leads (I think that the metal is tin) that connect to wires that can sense the movement of the joystick itself. Every time the joystick connects to a lead, that registers as a movement on screen. I am sure that you all know that already, but here’s the kicker. Mr. Koda found a way to make gold leads for the joysticks.
     
    The result? The joystick can respond faster and better than before with gold in it. I am guessing that it is the metallurgical properties of the gold. Gold is a great conductor of electricity, if memory serves me best. So, what better type of metal to complete a circuit in something like this than gold? I personally would love to have a controller like this in my collection. I like it, despite the con that I stated in this review.
     
    It may be expensive to upgrade your current joysticks with this technology. After all, gold is expensive. We all know that. But, if money is no object for you, then you might want to consider it. It is well worth it. I also have a picture of the upgraded joystick in the review. Thanks for letting me share and I will return with other things to talk about.
     

     
    NOTE: This is the upgraded joystick in question.
  18. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from Justin in Atari ProLine Joystick Upgrade from Best Electronics: Review…   
    Recently, I was putting through its paces a ProLine Joystick with the Best Electronics gold joystick upgrade in it, designed by Bradley Koda. When I started using it, the difference between that and a standard joystick in performance was like night and day. Compared to a stock ProLine joystick from Atari without the upgrade, well, let’s just say the upgraded joystick blew it away. It handled much better and is more well-rounded.
     
    I can explain. Remember the review I did on “Ikari Warriors” for the 7800? Well, I used the upgraded joystick. That was the reason why I achieved my personal best score ever recorded in that game. I also use a European Atari 7800 joypad. Now, on “Ikari Warriors,” the joypad plays quite sluggishly as opposed to the upgraded joystick. The movement on the joystick after upgrades is much smoother. There is definitely less hassle.
     
    But, the joystick can handle too smoothly on other games. I was playing “Taz” with it once, and I achieved a lower score and could not get over a certain point in the game. I do admit, however, that I need to play “Taz” more. I guess I need more practice with that upgraded controller. Overall, as some would say, this controller is the bee’s knees.
     
    Here’s how it works. Normally, the innards of your joystick are made with four cheap metal button-like leads (I think that the metal is tin) that connect to wires that can sense the movement of the joystick itself. Every time the joystick connects to a lead, that registers as a movement on screen. I am sure that you all know that already, but here’s the kicker. Mr. Koda found a way to make gold leads for the joysticks.
     
    The result? The joystick can respond faster and better than before with gold in it. I am guessing that it is the metallurgical properties of the gold. Gold is a great conductor of electricity, if memory serves me best. So, what better type of metal to complete a circuit in something like this than gold? I personally would love to have a controller like this in my collection. I like it, despite the con that I stated in this review.
     
    It may be expensive to upgrade your current joysticks with this technology. After all, gold is expensive. We all know that. But, if money is no object for you, then you might want to consider it. It is well worth it. I also have a picture of the upgraded joystick in the review. Thanks for letting me share and I will return with other things to talk about.
     

     
    NOTE: This is the upgraded joystick in question.
  19. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from RickR in Atari ProLine Joystick Upgrade from Best Electronics: Review…   
    Recently, I was putting through its paces a ProLine Joystick with the Best Electronics gold joystick upgrade in it, designed by Bradley Koda. When I started using it, the difference between that and a standard joystick in performance was like night and day. Compared to a stock ProLine joystick from Atari without the upgrade, well, let’s just say the upgraded joystick blew it away. It handled much better and is more well-rounded.
     
    I can explain. Remember the review I did on “Ikari Warriors” for the 7800? Well, I used the upgraded joystick. That was the reason why I achieved my personal best score ever recorded in that game. I also use a European Atari 7800 joypad. Now, on “Ikari Warriors,” the joypad plays quite sluggishly as opposed to the upgraded joystick. The movement on the joystick after upgrades is much smoother. There is definitely less hassle.
     
    But, the joystick can handle too smoothly on other games. I was playing “Taz” with it once, and I achieved a lower score and could not get over a certain point in the game. I do admit, however, that I need to play “Taz” more. I guess I need more practice with that upgraded controller. Overall, as some would say, this controller is the bee’s knees.
     
    Here’s how it works. Normally, the innards of your joystick are made with four cheap metal button-like leads (I think that the metal is tin) that connect to wires that can sense the movement of the joystick itself. Every time the joystick connects to a lead, that registers as a movement on screen. I am sure that you all know that already, but here’s the kicker. Mr. Koda found a way to make gold leads for the joysticks.
     
    The result? The joystick can respond faster and better than before with gold in it. I am guessing that it is the metallurgical properties of the gold. Gold is a great conductor of electricity, if memory serves me best. So, what better type of metal to complete a circuit in something like this than gold? I personally would love to have a controller like this in my collection. I like it, despite the con that I stated in this review.
     
    It may be expensive to upgrade your current joysticks with this technology. After all, gold is expensive. We all know that. But, if money is no object for you, then you might want to consider it. It is well worth it. I also have a picture of the upgraded joystick in the review. Thanks for letting me share and I will return with other things to talk about.
     

     
    NOTE: This is the upgraded joystick in question.
  20. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from Lost Dragon in Atari 7800 Ikari Warriors Review…   
    On Tuesday, March 8, 2016, I achieved my all-time personal high score of 114,800 points at Novice setting on the Atari 7800 ProSystem version of “Ikari Warriors.” I think that this is the best home version of the SNK arcade classic. It has four difficulty settings: Novice, Intermediate, Advance, and Expert. I have also included screenshots showing proof of this achievement showing my score. I also have included shots of how the game looks.
     
    Here is the synopsis of the game. You (and your partner, if two players), crash your warplane in a jungle infested with all kinds of enemy military soldiers. They shoot at you, bombard you with grenades and mortars, send tanks and helicopters after you, and even send suicide bombers after you. You have to traverse jungles, rivers, lakes, and enemy fortifications. All the while, you have to pick up ammunition, grenades, and you can even steal tanks.
     
    There are soldiers in blue and in orange. The orange-uniformed soldiers have power-ups that you can get after you kill them. They have ammo, grenades, flamethrowers, incendiary bombs, and even fuel for tanks (which adds to ammo if you do not have a tank anyway). I do not know if there is a definitive ending to this game, since I have never made it that far yet in the game to find out. I will keep you posted if there is.
     
    Out of the versions for the 7800, 2600, and NES, like I said, I think that this is the truest to the arcade experience. The graphics are outstanding and so is the sound. It is very close the arcade version in layout, probably more so than Nintendo’s version. Nintendo made a lot of changes to their titles derived from arcade games, which I think spoils the fun of trying to mimic the arcades at home. That is my two cents anyway.
     
    Anyway, that concludes the review for this game. I will be back for more in the future, since I have thirty years’ worth of collected games from six Atari platforms, including the 8-bit computer. I have enough material to keep myself busy writing reviews for a long time. Thank you for reading and I will return.
     

  21. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from MaximumRD in Atari 7800 Ikari Warriors Review…   
    On Tuesday, March 8, 2016, I achieved my all-time personal high score of 114,800 points at Novice setting on the Atari 7800 ProSystem version of “Ikari Warriors.” I think that this is the best home version of the SNK arcade classic. It has four difficulty settings: Novice, Intermediate, Advance, and Expert. I have also included screenshots showing proof of this achievement showing my score. I also have included shots of how the game looks.
     
    Here is the synopsis of the game. You (and your partner, if two players), crash your warplane in a jungle infested with all kinds of enemy military soldiers. They shoot at you, bombard you with grenades and mortars, send tanks and helicopters after you, and even send suicide bombers after you. You have to traverse jungles, rivers, lakes, and enemy fortifications. All the while, you have to pick up ammunition, grenades, and you can even steal tanks.
     
    There are soldiers in blue and in orange. The orange-uniformed soldiers have power-ups that you can get after you kill them. They have ammo, grenades, flamethrowers, incendiary bombs, and even fuel for tanks (which adds to ammo if you do not have a tank anyway). I do not know if there is a definitive ending to this game, since I have never made it that far yet in the game to find out. I will keep you posted if there is.
     
    Out of the versions for the 7800, 2600, and NES, like I said, I think that this is the truest to the arcade experience. The graphics are outstanding and so is the sound. It is very close the arcade version in layout, probably more so than Nintendo’s version. Nintendo made a lot of changes to their titles derived from arcade games, which I think spoils the fun of trying to mimic the arcades at home. That is my two cents anyway.
     
    Anyway, that concludes the review for this game. I will be back for more in the future, since I have thirty years’ worth of collected games from six Atari platforms, including the 8-bit computer. I have enough material to keep myself busy writing reviews for a long time. Thank you for reading and I will return.
     

  22. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from Atari 5200 Guy in Dinky Do Review…   
    Hi, folks,
     
    This is the commentary for an 8-bit puzzle game called Dinky Do (my high score is in the Scoreboard section of the forum). You play a penguin-like bird that has to collect treasure and avoid obstacles in nine caverns (there would have been more levels, but the game was never finished). If you run out of air at any time in any one level, you die. You can also fall or get hit by boulders and falling stalactites. Here are some pictures of what the game looks like in order of how the levels play, starting at level one:
     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    My documented high score is 2,010 on this game. It really is a great game by programmer Steven Macilwee. Thanks.
  23. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from Justin in Dinky Do - Atari 8-Bit Computers   
    Dinky Do
    Atari 8-Bit Computers
    Difficulty: Default
    High Score: 2,010
    January 3rd, 2016
  24. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from Justin in Dinky Do Review…   
    Hi, folks,
     
    This is the commentary for an 8-bit puzzle game called Dinky Do (my high score is in the Scoreboard section of the forum). You play a penguin-like bird that has to collect treasure and avoid obstacles in nine caverns (there would have been more levels, but the game was never finished). If you run out of air at any time in any one level, you die. You can also fall or get hit by boulders and falling stalactites. Here are some pictures of what the game looks like in order of how the levels play, starting at level one:
     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    My documented high score is 2,010 on this game. It really is a great game by programmer Steven Macilwee. Thanks.
  25. Like
    DegasElite got a reaction from Zontar in Dinky Do - Atari 8-Bit Computers   
    Dinky Do
    Atari 8-Bit Computers
    Difficulty: Default
    High Score: 2,010
    January 3rd, 2016
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