Jump to content

dgrubb

Member
  • Content Count

    78
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    2

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    dgrubb got a reaction from Justin in Frosted Atari Lynx Stand   
    Shame about the big RF shield inhibiting the view of the motherboard, because this is damn sexy otherwise:
     
    https://www.rosecoloredgaming.com/shop/snes-reimagined/
  2. Like
    dgrubb reacted to Justin in Frosted Atari Lynx Stand   
    Check out the Rose Colored Gaming website: https://www.rosecoloredgaming.com
     
    I also follow them on Instagram @rosecoloredgaming here: https://www.instagram.com/rosecoloredgaming/
  3. Like
    dgrubb reacted to Clint Thompson in Frosted Atari Lynx Stand   
    For those who may not have already seen this elsewhere, I received some really nice frosted and clear Lynx stands today and can't express just how nice they are. Especially considering the price for two of them shipped to me was right at $20. Look up RoseColoredGaming if you're interested. 7.99 once you add it to the cart otherwise they're $9.99 normally.
     

     

     

     
    and by itself:
     

     
    Both clear and frosted:
     

  4. Like
    dgrubb got a reaction from schmudde in Contemporary flatscreen and a 2600   
    Fixed link: https://www.amazon.com/NOVPEAK-Warranty-Converter-Composite-Blue-Ray/dp/B01N0HGKD2?SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q
     
    But no, CrossBow pretty effectively summed up your options, of which modding is probably actually the option which will be cheapest and leave you with the best quality image at the end of it:
     
  5. Like
    dgrubb reacted to CrossBow in Contemporary flatscreen and a 2600   
    That converter actually downgrades HDMI to composite and L/R audio RCA. They do make RCA to HDMI for sure as I actually use one in my video mix that all my classic consoles go through. My year old Sony I use in my game room only has a shared composite/component, HDMI, and Coax Ant inputs on it. As a result, all of my modded consoles go through a large powered AV selector that then outputs to a s-video & composite RCA to HDMI output converter/upscaler and then eventually to my TV. 
     
    But again, you would have to get the signal to a composite or s-video format first before you could use such a thing. They even make RF to HDMI converters, but I just don't see the point in something like that. 
     
    I did list in my suggestions on using a different TV. I didn't state what kind but CRT is certainly part of that. The VCR is also an excellent suggestion since most VCRs did cable antenna passthrough to composite. So basically VCRs have built in de-modulators as well to accomplish this. 
     
    I love the aesthetics of the original consoles, but I also prefer to play them in a convenient way. For me, that is to AV mod them if possible and run them all on one TV if at all possible. So far I've managed to be able to do this. However, I also have spares of nearly ever console I own that aren't modded for the collector side of me. But for my daily game playing system that will never be pristine while out in the mix and being used, I have no issues with modding them.
  6. Like
    dgrubb reacted to CrossBow in Contemporary flatscreen and a 2600   
    Well... I haven't used any of the cheap composite mod boards on the bay, but I know that the mod boards I have used and especially the ones from Bryan's UAV board, have worked on all flat panels I've used with it. 
     
    While there are always differences and certainly a YMMV kind of deal with these mods, for the most part there isn't too much science required to make them work. Nearly all of these consoles originally output a composite signal to begin with that is then ran through, amp'd and combined with the audio to create the RF signal from the RF modulator. So most of these mods just tap off that video composite signal and amp it to a level that a TV will see and lock in on to display.
  7. Like
    dgrubb reacted to Atari 5200 Guy in Contemporary flatscreen and a 2600   
    Do you want my honest opinion? You would probably be better off getting an old CRT TV. Digital is good for modern technology but is a royal pain in the rear when trying to get older technology to work with it.
     
    Often time you can find CRTs on curb sides free for the taking. Goodwill and most other second hand stores can't accept CRT TVs anymore and just let them stay outside waiting for the trash company to come and take them away. Also check eBay and Craigslist, local yard sales, things of that nature. If you want to play Atari then might as well do it the way it was intended to be played. Getting a CRT TV is a sure fire way to get an Atari p!aging. There is no guarantee that your Atari, even with signal modifying equipment being used, will work with your new TV.
     
    I guess it boils down to opinion. But would you rather spend, for example, $50 on a converter of some sort or use a portion of the $50 or none at all getting an older TV that will work with your Atari and any other older game or computer you might want to get someday? Just another option to think about.
  8. Like
    dgrubb got a reaction from Justin in Contemporary flatscreen and a 2600   
    Fixed link: https://www.amazon.com/NOVPEAK-Warranty-Converter-Composite-Blue-Ray/dp/B01N0HGKD2?SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q
     
    But no, CrossBow pretty effectively summed up your options, of which modding is probably actually the option which will be cheapest and leave you with the best quality image at the end of it:
     
  9. Like
    dgrubb reacted to CrossBow in Contemporary flatscreen and a 2600   
    I will try and sum this up best I can.
     
    What you have is an RF signal from the 2600 that needs to be de-modulated in order to work on a composite input on your TV. De-modulators are more expensive. If you are sure your new Samsung isn't able to tune in to the signal from the 2600. Then your options are:
     
    - Purchase a De-modulator that takes RF and splits it back out to separate Video and Left/Right audio like this: 
    https://www.amazon.com/Analog-NTSC-Tuner-Demodulator-Output/dp/B01KC03BQ2/ref=sr_1_3?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1521055119&sr=1-3&keywords=rf+demodulator
     
    - Or get your 2600 A/V modded
    - Use a different TV altogether
     
    I know...not the best solutions but that is where you are at. Now, having said that, have you tried to use your Samsung's auto scan function on the channels? Here is what I do with a new TV to be sure it will see the old Consoles. I put a game into the Atari and turn it on. I then go to the channel section of my TV and have it auto scan for channels from the Antenna side. Doing this, the TV should see and lock in on the 2600 video out signal. But if it doesn't or this isn't an option, then you are looking at the suggestions I gave above. But again, for the price of a de-modulator, you might as well get your 2600 AV modded at that point.
  10. Like
    dgrubb reacted to Atari 5200 Guy in Contemporary flatscreen and a 2600   
    I'm going to throw in my two cents worth here.  
     
    Most modern TV's now have the coax connector for digital-only signals.  Meaning that you can make use of digital TV antennas without any other electronics necessary.  However, in doing so it will never be able to pick up an analog signal again.  But, there might be a trick you can do to get your Atari to work on that TV...that is if it has composite inputs (yellow, red, white).  Find a cheap VCR.  It can be mono or hi-fi doesn't matter.  Connect the 2600 to the VCR and change the VCR channel to the channel your 2600 is set for (2 or 3 in most cases).  Use RCA cables to connect the VCR's video and audio out signals to your TV's composite inputs.  Video will be yellow and if you have only one audio out on the VCR then either the red or white input on the TV should become a mono channel meaning even if only one port is used sound will output to both speakers.  
     
    If you don't have a VCR they can be picked up rather cheap depending on your location.  I'm not sure where you are from, and mean no disrespect or anything, I just don't know how much a VCR costs in other parts of the world.  Get a good used one for this...and it doesn't necessarily have to play tapes.  As long as it turns on and can receive and send video and audio signals you can use it as a de-modulator.  Almost all VCRs from the 1980s and up have this built in.  
     
    On a side note:  I have a ViewTV digital TV box that does quite a bit (I can play movies from the Internet Archives on this thing from a USB stick!).  I wanted to see if it would also pick up a signal from an Atari console since the ViewTV can record as well.  I was going to try to use it as a game capture device.  But, alas, it wouldn't detect it because it has no way of detecting analog signals.  
     
    With that being said you might be better off trying to find a converter that will change your Atari's signal from analog to digital much like those boxes that changed analog antenna signals into digital ones when it was being forced to remove analog TV signals completely.  One of those might actually work if those are still around.  
  11. Like
    dgrubb reacted to Atari 5200 Guy in Soldering   
    I have been soldering since I was 7 years old.  I was fortunate enough that my hometown's local Radio Shack crew were also long time family friends on my Dad's side of the family.  On weekends I would spend with my Grandmother I would jet down to Radio Shack (a few blocks away) were they taught me how to solder and work on electronics.  They trained my eyes and ears to spot things.  It was not uncommon for me to spend about two hours there and a few times Grandma had to work on Saturdays they kept me there with them.  A few times they would send me home with PPG electronic kits and one Christmas they gifted me an all-in-one electronic station, the best one they had in store.  They also gave me my first soldering iron, solder, and desoldering iron identical to what I used in training.  I'm not sure if it was pay for helping when they couldn't figure out problematic products or what but I enjoyed doing it and those memories are still with me to this day.  A skill set I still use everyday.  I have built on those skills over the years and made up my own tricks for stubborn solder that refuses to be removed.  I guess losing my father at 3 years old when the whole town knew and loved him did have some advantages...I just wish he could have been here to see what I had accomplished at a young age.
     
    Because of those skills I was always the one my Dad's family turned to when their electronics were giving them problems.  Every two months I was having to fix RCA CED Players (the SJT models) which 90% of the time was caused by dirt built up around the stylus.  Other times it was a faulty belt for the loading mechanism.  One model dropped the height of the turntable which took me a while to figure out but eventually realized what that big nut on the bottom of the machines were for.  I never used or needed technical manuals.  I looked, popped the tops, plugged in and tried to power on any device I was working on.  Then I would try to operate the machines as intended while I watched and listened.  It's a skill that is great to have but it is also a skill that is not needed much any more.  It's generally cheaper just to replace with new electronics but things like game machines, computers, and movie players still around still need someone around with these skills.
     
    I still laugh at how they taught me the resistor code so it would stick.  Bad Boys Rape Our Young Girls But Violet Gives Willingly.  Basically Black Brown, Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Violet, Grey, and White.  It's not nice now that I think about it but made it easy for me to remember the color codes.  Good times I would relive again if I could.
  12. Like
    dgrubb reacted to RickR in Installing a floppy emulator in an ST computer   
    I went ahead and did it -- installed a floppy emulator in my Atari ST. 
     
    What is it?  A GOTEK floppy emulator allows you to place disk images on a USB memory stick and run them on a vintage PC.  It can run almost any of the images you can find on the internet, but the speed is identical to a real floppy drive. 
     
    Why?  Why?  Are you nuts?  Why NOT!  In all seriousness, the Commodore Amiga I just purchased came with one of these, and I was so impressed with it, I decided to install the same in my ST.  The ability to load any games via USB?  I'm IN!
     
    Where did you get it?  I purchased on ebay from a nice fellow from Greece.  Search for "Atari GOTEK" and pick your favorite.  I ended up not buying the cheapest item.  But this seller had a lot of good information on his listing and also answered my questions before purchase.  Shipping was much faster than expected. 
     
    Here's some shots of the item as it came:
     

     

     
    Here is my Atari 520STFM before surgery
     

     
    Please note: my ST case has been hacked to use a PC floppy drive.  I'm not happy about it, but I got a good deal.
     

     
    Here's the inside "before".
     

     
    And here's the emulator installed:
     

     
    Fired it up, and it works perfectly!  You simply choose the directory and game, and press the F7 key to boot that image.
     

     

     

     

     
    The only secret is to put to config files in the root directory of your USB memory stick.  Easy!
     
     
  13. Like
    dgrubb got a reaction from btbfilms76 in Soldering   
    The topic of soldering has come up a fair bit recently so I thought it'd be helpful to share this playlist of soldering tutorials from EEVblog. I found them useful when I first started doing a lot of solder work on a regular basis:
     
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2862BF3631A5C1AA
  14. Like
    dgrubb got a reaction from TrekMD in Jaguar USB Tap - Kickstarter   
    The campaign has finished and is fully funded! Thank you to everybody who pledged and, also, to everybody who didn't pledge but nonetheless were very supportive of the project.
  15. Like
    dgrubb got a reaction from GRay Defender in Soldering   
    The topic of soldering has come up a fair bit recently so I thought it'd be helpful to share this playlist of soldering tutorials from EEVblog. I found them useful when I first started doing a lot of solder work on a regular basis:
     
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2862BF3631A5C1AA
  16. Like
    dgrubb reacted to Clint Thompson in Jaguar USB Tap - Kickstarter   
    Thanks for making these! If you have any extras or more to sell, I can make a post on the Jaguar FB page as well, though I'm guessing most already know about it by now.
  17. Like
    dgrubb got a reaction from Clint Thompson in Jaguar USB Tap - Kickstarter   
    The campaign has finished and is fully funded! Thank you to everybody who pledged and, also, to everybody who didn't pledge but nonetheless were very supportive of the project.
  18. Like
    dgrubb got a reaction from Atarileaf in Atari Heavy Sixer Ribbon Problem   
    Dab a small bit of flux onto your braid. You're essentially trying to create the same effect as when you solder to pads, but in the reverse direction.
     
     
     
    I use hot air a lot because, for most tasks, you don't need a terribly good unit and can get away with doing decent work with something cheap. I got one for work where I needed to do some SMD rework for ~$40. At that price I'm just going to use it until destruction and replace with something similar if the need arises again.
     
    N.B., I thought those suckers were a great idea until I had to actually do a lot of removal. It's handy for removing large amounts from some awkward spots, but it doesn't seem to really do much better than a bit of braid.
  19. Like
    dgrubb reacted to Atarileaf in Atari Heavy Sixer Ribbon Problem   
    The desoldering guns are the best way to go but unless you use them a lot I can't justify the expense. RickR is correct that it seems like you need the iron really hot for desoldering braid. I normally prefer solder suckers but these tiny solder points on IC's that are so close together seem impossible to suck up.
  20. Like
    dgrubb reacted to RickR in Atari Heavy Sixer Ribbon Problem   
    Thanks for the 350 tip.  I'll use that too. 
     
    I use the copper braid to un-solder stuff.  But it seems like you have to crank up the heat to get that to actually work.  I know...I should probably invest in a nicer way to de-solder stuff. 
  21. Like
    dgrubb reacted to Atarileaf in Is it normal to feel this way?   
    Thanks for the advice guys. I'll have to invest in an anti static wrist strap before i continue working on these systems for sure
  22. Like
    dgrubb reacted to Justin in 10 of my favorite AMIGA games....   
    That is a great story Atarileaf. I love the Amiga and wish I could get my hands on an A500 with a monitor for $10 
  23. Like
    dgrubb reacted to Atarileaf in 10 of my favorite AMIGA games....   
    Unfortunately I traded it to another collector about a year after this since I couldn't find any software or games for it and I think this might have been before I was using ebay to find games. I don't think I started using ebay until 1999 or 2000 and this was a couple of years before that. It's too bad because I wish I still had it now
  24. Like
    dgrubb reacted to RickR in 10 of my favorite AMIGA games....   
    Amiga 500 with expanded memory and a floppy emulator. 
     
     

  25. Like
    dgrubb reacted to Atarileaf in 10 of my favorite AMIGA games....   
    The Amiga just screams "cool". I owned one very briefly in the late 90's, the A500 I believe. I found it in a thrift store but not the way you'd think. It was sitting in a shopping cart by the office door with the monitor. I asked if it was for sale and the woman said it was there to get it out of the way because the Amiga was their thrift stores office computer but they had just replaced it with a Windows PC so although they hadn't intended on selling it she actually said that sure, she'd sell it and I was floored when she said I could have it for $10. 
×
×
  • Create New...