Jump to content

34 Years Ago Today, the Greatest Movie of All Time Was Released


Rowsdower70
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is one of those movies which re-rezzes me just thinking about it.

The world it creates takes us to an alternate reality where inner existence is explored.

 

It's like it took on quantum theory years before this was discussed in more normalized discussions, outside of specialist science and in consideration of the meaning of life itself.

 

While these notions might seem far-fetched, the movie's basic premise, unique visuals and electro-pastoral soundtrack elevates the experience beyond the younger target audience storyline and dialogue.

 

I dunno. I just love it to bits.

(get it? To bits? eh?)

("nonononono")

(ehhh, okay)

 

And atarifan95, you're in for a treat.

Just know that the blu-ray release cleaned up the the original flash-frame 'defects' which resulted from a processing error on several post-animated frames.

This gave it a great flashing effect that added to the unique visual environment of being stuck inside a computer's 'thoughts'.

 

The 20th anniversary dvd has the original print intact and looks pretty great.

 

I still enjoy both versions, cuz the original is stuck in my head as it gained regular rotation viewing years after its release, on this lucky afternoon vhs taping of it sometime in the 80s.

Used up a whole tape in SP mode, which - given tape costs back then - I didn't do often, or at all.

 

But yeah, this is one of the greats, and much worth celebration as a movie, as a think-piece, as a sensory event.

 

The sequel was also pretty good. I have issues with it, which I don't wanna go into cuz I'd rather build up my love for the series than pick at its weak stems.

Not as colorful, maybe. But the 3D is terrific (if you can get it).

Jeff Bridges has always been a film idol, but he became my film hero for coming back to do this.

 

The animated series is interesting and lively. A nifty addition as springpoint between the original movie and the sequel.

 

End of line

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I knew one of the animators who worked on that film!  It was a real challenge for them to do any kind of 3D animation back in the day because, well, the software for it didn't exist. 

So everything had to be designed with simple shapes in mind so that they could do 3D transformations (e.g. translation, rotation, scale, squash/stretch) more easily.  Thats why everything had a 'simple' design to it.

 

For example, that light cycle sequence is ALL math, from rotating 90 degree angles manually to all those shapes to translations.  Those guys were pioneers. They used a Evans & Sutherland Picture System 2 system to produce the 3D graphics.

 ps300.gif

 

To think, most of that film was shoot using green screen techniques.  We wouldn't see anything like that for nearly 22 years later with 'Skycaptain and the World of Tomorrow' and shortly after that, 300.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pasted below is the Tron chapter of the Classic-Gaming Bookcast (without the images). I'm only including it because I thought you guys might enjoy reading it. I didn't realize that there were other huge fans of the film, at least beyond the association-with-old-games interest level. I hope you enjoy it...it was unexpectedly difficult to articulate why the movie means so much to me!

 

---

 

In late 1982 or early '83, we rented the movie Tron for our Betamax VCR. Preposterously, I hadn't gotten around to seeing it on the big screen. I figured out how to copy it, using a borrowed second machine, and watched it over and over again. I bought the VHS tape five or six years later, and the double DVD on the film's twentieth anniversary in '02.

 

Some of the dialogue might have been hokey, even when the movie was new, but I was mesmerized by the visualizations and plot details. I tended to live in my own world half the time anyway; upon seeing Tron, I transformed the real one from inside my head. I didn't quite mean to. It just made the repetitious things in a kid's life cooler. I left solid walls of light along the sidewalk, and the glinting tiles and painted-over bricks of my elementary school became circuited tunnels through which I ominously soared.

 

I wasn't noticeably physical about any of this. I didn't have to be. I'd already filled my skull with video-game images over the prior year. Now the three-dimensional ramifications of living in that universe were absorbed into my mental metabolism. The screens that connected the everyday world to these new ones weren't monitors or television tubes, but windows. Locations from various games flew enticingly past me as I walked by things as formerly ordinary as jungle gyms and chain-link fences.

 

It's not that I didn't enjoy being a kid. There were simply aspects that I found objectionable. Being expected to attend school every day felt like a prison sentence. And I reviled not having the adult abilities to do stuff. This didn't concern unrestricted toy shopping, theme-park trips or other external extravagances. I wanted to play real musical instruments and write real books. I could save odd-job money toward the former, and practice the latter on my mom's typewriter; but I wasn't skilled yet, and I was impatient to truly get started.

 

Something that was possible, however, was to competently explore that limitless other place, finding and doing things previously consigned to my imagination. Tron alluringly blurred the line. I could even learn to create my own parts of that other place, if only I could get my hands on a computer.

 

As I was already acclimating myself to a coexistence with other humans by adopting the crucial society-is-stupidly-funny mindset (I didn't know how to apply words like "absurdly amusing"), it was impactful to see just how easily alternate life could be created. My widening eyes watched Flynn and Alan actually communicating with the humanoid programs they'd "written," using secret messages such as "Request access to Clu program. Code 6 password to memory 0222." Outside the VCR, every spinning thing that I saw reminded me of the Master Control Program, and anything laid out in a grid fashion was an electronic, beautifully unambiguous expanse.

 

When Flynn was sucked into the collective digital world and was able to interact with the walking, talking realizations of his own keyboard work, I was sucked in, myself. The main function of teachers seemed to be to detract my attention from the things with which I really loved to fill my brain. Their inapplicable blather might have prepared me to be a good drone, so it's fortunate that affordable home video games came along when they did.

 

I believe that I initially played the Tron coin-op in the small game room at Uncle Cliff's, an Albuquerque amusement park. (The name has since been changed to Cliff's, but he's not fooling anyone. He's still my uncle!) When I play it now, it strikes me as a continually repeated quartet of largely derivative sub-games that rapidly rise in difficulty. It's blatantly designed to scarf up as much money as possible. In this sense, I suppose, it was technologically prophetic.

 

My associations with the game are so positive that I occasionally play it anyway. I have a great time, notwithstanding any opinions I've formed since the '80s. This is perhaps the only arcade game from which I can't objectively detach my early affection, for the kid Chris was captivated. It was as close as I could get to literally playing a part in the movie, and I watched older players until I memorized their tactics and patterns. I became quite good myself, and still remember most of the maneuvers.

 

In fact, if I'm out on one of my treasured nighttime walks and I get hit by a falling piano or something, I'll be in trouble when I try to recall my blood type. The poor paramedic will hear little more than, "High speed. Forward. Right. Left. Left. Left." He'll be all set if he ever gives up his work to drive a Light Cycle, though. I should know.

 


http://www.orphanedgames.com

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

28163076751_40d6540c21_o.gif

 

28240731035_bf334fdfb4_o.gif

 

28240730495_c7401314da_o.gif

 

My dad really, really liked Tron -- so much so that I have a strong memory of watching him playing the Discs of Tron arcade game when I was incredibly young, long before I'd seen the movie.  I cant' recall watching him ever play another arcade game, in all my years.  Whether it was just that he was always saving the quarters/tokens for us kids to be able to play, or whether it was just that Discs of Tron is a very memorable game, or whether it was something else entirely, I don't know...

 

I can't quantify it, but I'd argue that his love for the movie could ultimately be the catalyst behind much of my own love for computers, arcade games, and unique special effects.

 

Seeing the sequel in 3D on the big screen is honestly one of the highlights of my movie-going life.  I like to think that the awe and wonder that I felt wasn't dissimilar to what people felt when they first saw the original.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

My dad really, really liked Tron -- so much so that I have a strong memory of watching him playing the Discs of Tron arcade game when I was incredibly young, long before I'd seen the movie.  I cant' recall watching him ever play another arcade game, in all my years.  Whether it was just that he was always saving the quarters/tokens for us kids to be able to play, or whether it was just that Discs of Tron is a very memorable game, or whether it was something else entirely, I don't know...

 

I can't quantify it, but I'd argue that his love for the movie could ultimately be the catalyst behind much of my own love for computers, arcade games, and unique special effects.

 

Seeing the sequel in 3D on the big screen is honestly one of the highlights of my movie-going life.  I like to think that the awe and wonder that I felt wasn't dissimilar to what people felt when they first saw the original.

At least for me it was very similar.  

 

I saw Legacy 5 times in the theaters.   That's VERY excessive for me, but I freely admit my obsession with the franchise.

The World of Tron was an ultimate escape for me as a kid growing up.  I had countless scenarios in my head for this vast world I imagined. 

 

"For you - Rowsdower from the 70 - have been appointed Omnivisioner of the Game Grid."  ~ Atari Adventure Square

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I concur! Really crossing my fingers they make the third one; I'm hearing rumors but nothing substantial at this point.

They bring it up from time to time.  I think Disney hasn't ruled it out, but its not a work in progress at this point.

 

Heck I'd even settle for another season of Tron:Uprising to tide me over.

"For you - Rowsdower from the 70 - have been appointed Omnivisioner of the Game Grid."  ~ Atari Adventure Square

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...