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mojoatomic

Hello from Memphis, TN

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Hi all, found this forum, read a few posts and had to join. This is only the second Atari forum I've participated in :) last ones were BBS's, so it's been awhile :)

 

I started out in the early days as an Atari authorized service center tech and repaired/refurbished more consoles than you could shake a stick at. Looks like Atari never left and I've still played it all of these years.

 

I'm an IT admin now, but I started out as a lowly bench tech. If you were good, they called you a  "gunslinger" back then  - which seems kind of silly, but it was considered high praise at the time. It was a name reserved for the high end guys who took care of the issues no body else had any luck with, or the ones that were considered to difficult for field personal. Not necessarily related to Atari, just in general.

 

We took contracts with any manufacturer who needed depot style repair where we could get decent money and secure a steady parts chain and factory level service material. I've professionally repaired everything from Bang & Olufsen, Macintosh (not the computer), Apple (the computer), Commodore, Nakamichi, Data South, Unisys, Daisy Tech, Atari (many models), Marantz and more. Nothing was thrown away back then - if it was of quality & had value,  it was all repaired. The Atari was no exception - the 2600's were extremely well made units, and made to be repaired. Actually... they were made to be repaired by folks who knew how to use o-scopes and logic probes. The manuals are geared to flow chart troubleshooting , but the real repair happened at the end of a scope probe. The flow charts were for the new guys and ones destined for field repair. 

 

Anyway, a friend asked me to do a repair on a 2600, so I got into the loft looking for a few parts and would up finding all of my service gear, parts and manuals that I had packed away for who knows why (but I'm glad I did) - and it turns out... I can still repair them like nobody's business. 

 

:) 

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I've got a nice little project to work on.  A 2600 4 switch board that needs one of the joystick ports replaced.  I've got a new port.  But not the confidence to de-solder and remove the old part. 

What do you use as a de-solder tool?  I've got both copper braid, and one of those clicky thumb sucker tools (it's never been opened -- never used it).  No rush or anything, I was just curious which would be the better bet.  My plan was just to try both and see with works best.  After all, there are 9 pins to experiment on.  ;)

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Hi all, found this forum, read a few posts and had to join. This is only the second Atari forum I've participated in :-) last ones were BBS's, so it's been awhile :-)

 

I started out in the early days as an Atari authorized service center tech and repaired/refurbished more consoles than you could shake a stick at. Looks like Atari never left and I've still played it all of these years.

 

I'm an IT admin now, but I started out as a lowly bench tech. If you were good, they called you a  "gunslinger" back then  - which seems kind of silly, but it was considered high praise at the time. It was a name reserved for the high end guys who took care of the issues no body else had any luck with, or the ones that were considered to difficult for field personal. Not necessarily related to Atari, just in general.

 

We took contracts with any manufacturer who needed depot style repair where we could get decent money and secure a steady parts chain and factory level service material. I've professionally repaired everything from Bang & Olufsen, Macintosh (not the computer), Apple (the computer), Commodore, Nakamichi, Data South, Unisys, Daisy Tech, Atari (many models), Marantz and more. Nothing was thrown away back then - if it was of quality & had value,  it was all repaired. The Atari was no exception - the 2600's were extremely well made units, and made to be repaired. Actually... they were made to be repaired by folks who knew how to use o-scopes and logic probes. The manuals are geared to flow chart troubleshooting , but the real repair happened at the end of a scope probe. The flow charts were for the new guys and ones destined for field repair. 

 

Anyway, a friend asked me to do a repair on a 2600, so I got into the loft looking for a few parts and would up finding all of my service gear, parts and manuals that I had packed away for who knows why (but I'm glad I did) - and it turns out... I can still repair them like nobody's business. 

 

:-) 

Welcome yo!!!!! Always amazing to have knowledgeable techs here. I know I might pick your brain from time to time. 

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I've got a nice little project to work on.  A 2600 4 switch board that needs one of the joystick ports replaced.  I've got a new port.  But not the confidence to de-solder and remove the old part. 

 

What do you use as a de-solder tool?  I've got both copper braid, and one of those clicky thumb sucker tools (it's never been opened -- never used it).  No rush or anything, I was just curious which would be the better bet.  My plan was just to try both and see with works best.  After all, there are 9 pins to experiment on.  ;)

Well, I like most things Hakko and have for years, but when you buy it... you'll know it. My wife got me one of these 2 weeks ago for my birthday - and I LOVE it. I've had the Hakko version for awhile, but wanted another one wasn't prepared to drop another $1200 on another Hakko. 

 

I'd put the desoldering braid up, it's just gonna lift the pads and make you mad. I'd use the manual pump for sure. Just make sure to flow fresh solder (60/40 tin/lead) into the joint first, then use the pump. 

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Well, I like most things Hakko and have for years, but when you buy it... you'll know it. My wife got me one of these 2 weeks ago for my birthday - and I LOVE it. I've had the Hakko version for awhile, but wanted another one wasn't prepared to drop another $1200 on another Hakko. 

 

I'd put the desoldering braid up, it's just gonna lift the pads and make you mad. I'd use the manual pump for sure. Just make sure to flow fresh solder (60/40 tin/lead) into the joint first, then use the pump. 

I got this fellow for Christmas ... https://www.amazon.com/Aoyue-Contained-Desoldering-Internal-Carrying/dp/B00PGFAJWS/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1488422825&sr=1-1&keywords=aoyue+8800

 

first thing I used it on was the hex buffer chip on a heavy sixer. I was putting off doing it for a very long time cause of damage I did to other cadavers I was working on.

 

I was getting pretty good at using the bulb iron. https://www.radioshack.com/products/radioshack-45-watt-desoldering-iron?gclid=CPeHkebnttICFQZYDQodUwMH4g

 

but the vacuum pump was a real pleasure to use. I am still unsure how the manufacturers name is pronounced :P

 

welcome to the site :)

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I got this fellow for Christmas ... https://www.amazon.com/Aoyue-Contained-Desoldering-Internal-Carrying/dp/B00PGFAJWS/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1488422825&sr=1-1&keywords=aoyue+8800

 

first thing I used it on was the hex buffer chip on a heavy sixer. I was putting off doing it for a very long time cause of damage I did to other cadavers I was working on.

 

I was getting pretty good at using the bulb iron. https://www.radioshack.com/products/radioshack-45-watt-desoldering-iron?gclid=CPeHkebnttICFQZYDQodUwMH4g

 

but the vacuum pump was a real pleasure to use. I am still unsure how the manufacturers name is pronounced :P

 

welcome to the site :)

 

Wondered how you did without it for so long didn't you? :-) 

 

It really is the only way to preserve these boards for the future - the desoldering vacuum pump guns don't lift pads and you only keep heat on the board for a brief period of time. Best to flow fresh solder into the joints beforehand, though - makes the joint let go much more easily. 

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